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My Town: Volunteers needed for Kent County Parks clean-up projects

My Town: Volunteers needed for Kent County Parks clean-up projects

KENT COUNTY, Mich.-- The Kent County Parks Department is looking for volunteers to help clean up parks this spring.

The 2014 Kent County spring clean event has not been scheduled for a specific day,  because of lingering snow cover.  However, volunteers are encouraged to sign up with he Kent County Parks Department and let them know what projects they'd like to work on, when the time comes.

People interested in pitching in to improve any of the county's 34 parks should contact Volunteer Services at (616) 632-7842 or email park.volunteers@kentcountymi.gov .  Volunteers can explain what work they'd like to do, and the Parks Department will then organize the clean-up effort.  The spring clean event provides an opportunity to meet new community members and make a difference throughout Kent County.

My Town: Credit Union backs library book funding campaign

My Town: Credit Union backs library book funding campaign

 

GRANDVILLE, Mich. – Grandville-based First United Credit Union backing the Kent District Library’s campaign to replenish its budget.

Through the Genre Derby, KDL hopes to raise $10,000 for digital and physical books. That’s just a fraction of the $300,000 that’s been slashed from the library’s budget since 2013.

“Our overall budget has been cut by over $2 million in the past three years from changes in tax valuation and personal property tax,” explained KDL Development Manager Linda Krombeen. 

Despite the cuts, KDL is using technology and restructuring to avoid laying off staff.

The Genre Derby allows patrons to direct donations to the type of books they read most. First United Credit Union is pledging to match 50 percent of all donor gifts during the Genre Derby, up to $1,500.

My Town Comstock Park: Schools look to voters to keep 'Sinking Fund' alive

My Town Comstock Park: Schools look to voters to keep 'Sinking Fund' alive

COMSTOCK PARK, Mich.—With February elections over, the focus now for many school districts is May.

On Tuesday, May 6, Comstock Park Public Schools will ask voters to renew the district’s current “Sinking Fund” for another ten years.  The Sinking Fund can only be used for expenses on buildings, facilities and grounds.    Without the Sinking Fund, these annual maintenance costs would come from the district’s General Fund, which normally covers student programs, staff and services.

The Sinking Fund has previously helped cover roofs, parking lots, sidewalks, windows, doors, lockers, carpet, landscaping upkeep, gym floor refinishing and athletic field improvements.

My Town Comstock Park: New banners, planters planned for downtown

My Town Comstock Park: New banners, planters planned for downtown

COMSTOCK PARK, Mich.— New banners and pots filled with flowers will line the streets of downtown Comstock Park by early summer.

Jay Spencer says the Downtown Development Authority is working with Victory Signs in designing approximately 30 banners that will adorn the street lights along West River Drive and around the park in Comstock Park.  The banners will highlight Comstock Park. Additionally, the DDA plans to order 20 more planters to fill with flowers this year.  That’s in addition to the 10 flower planters it had out last year. 

My Town Comstock Park: Snow suspected culprit of library sign damage

My Town Comstock Park: Snow suspected culprit of library sign damage

COMSTOCK PARK, Mich.—The Comstock Park Downtown Development Authority is enlisting the help of a technician in determining if the heavy snow damaged the library’s electronic sign.

Plainfield Township Supervisor Jay Spencer, who is a member of the DDA, says the digital sign has had some issues.  He says the software that runs the sign has been upgraded, but a couple blocks of pixels on the sign are out.  Spencer suspects the mounting piles of snow, which have buried the sign, may be to blame, but the DDA is contacting an expert to determine the issue and how much repairs would cost.

Residents asked to adopt a fire hydrant and potentially save lives

Residents asked to adopt a fire hydrant and potentially save lives

COOPERSVILLE, Mich.—   The City of Coopersville is asking community members to do a little extra digging in the snow to help avoid a potentially deadly situation.

 Kim Grupa Ayers, the assistant to the city manager, says Coopersville is home to more than 250 hydrants, and some have been buried by the heavy snows.  Ayers says the city doesn’t have enough staff to keep up with clearing hydrants, but it’s important there is access, since the time it takes to find and tap a hydrant can mean the difference between life and death during a fire.

The city is asking residents to adopt a nearby fire hydrant and help keep it clear.  It's a request Alpine Township is also making of its residents, citing slippery roads and frozen hose lines as other winter hindrances for firefighters battling flames.  The Township's website reads: "Please do your part to keep you and your neighbors safe by clearing hydrants of snow."

Alpine Township to review master plan Jan. 15

Alpine Township to review master plan Jan. 15

ALPINE TOWNSHIP, Mich.—The Alpine Township Planning Commission and Board will team up Wednesday night to review the community’s master plan.

Under state law, all communities are required to review their master plan every five years and update it as necessary.  Planning Director Sue Baker intends to update statistical information, in light of new census numbers.

The “Joint Visioning Session” is open to the public and starts at 7 p.m. in the Township Hall.